Layers of London meets the needs of the KS2/3 curricula:

Citizenship

  • To appreciate the range of national, religious, regional, and ethnic identities in the UK
  • To recognise the role of voluntary, community and pressure groups
  • To think about the lives of people living in other places and times

Art and Design

  • Pupils should be taught about great architects and designers in history
  • Pupils should be taught about the history of design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times to present day

Computing

  • Understand computer networks and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • Use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked and be discerning in evaluating digital content

Geography

  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  • Human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors
  • Use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data

History – You can use Layers of London as a tool to enrich the history curriculum in any of these areas; for example you could look at the Romanisation of your borough as the topic for your class collection.

  • The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots
  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor
  • A local history study
  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066
  • The development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509
  • The development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745
  • Ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901
  • Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day

Religious Education

  • The community within which the school is located – RE provides opportunities to investigate patterns of diversity of religion and belief and forge links with different groups in the local area.
  • Enables pupils to build their sense of identity and belonging, which helps them flourish within their communities and as citizens in a diverse society

PSHE

  • To consider the lives of people living in other places, and people with different values and customs